Are ID’S a good IDea?

Weighing out the benefits and drawbacks of requiring student IDs

Anna Ward, Staff Writer

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    This school year came with a new stipulation: IDs.  Students now have to have their IDs readily accessible in case a teacher or administrator asks for it.  

    The IDs are needed in the school in order to improve safety precautions, pre-existing rules, and day to day operations.

    In the last few years, there have been many school shootings.  Sometimes a student commits the crime; however, other times, a stranger walks into the school without being stopped.  The school adopted the IDs because they improve safety. Every student has an ID, proving the student goes to the school.  When visitors come to the school, they are given a visitor tag. If a stranger is in the school, they are easily recognizable because they have no visible identification.  Wearing IDs provides additional safety to the student; the student just has to wear it.

    After last school year, many administrators realized students who were not early release or excused from class were leaving and entering the school without any trouble.  To improve this problem, administrators adopted gates that are controlled by IDs. When a student flashes their ID to the gate guard, the gate guard can quickly make sure they are not skipping and should be coming back to school.  Then, the gate is lifted, and the student can go in. This process ensures that only students who are supposed to be leaving can. Also, last year students from other high schools came onto the campus because there was no barrier; however, if they don’t have a Longview High School ID, they can’t go through the gate.  The ID makes sure that only LHS students are attending and only early release or excused students can leave and re-enter during the school day. The rules in the past are easier to enforce because of the IDs.

    On a normal school day, a student has to plug in their school ID multiple times like to check out library books or buy a school lunch.  Usually, a student has to type in a long 5 digit code that can be easily mistyped; however, with a swipeable ID, the lines move faster with no chance of delay.  

    Though often students consider IDs annoying and pointless, it is clear that they offer better safety, faster procedures, and improved school rules.  The benefits outweigh the drawbacks.